People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?

Loading

For some reason, there’s an upsurge in returns for the hyped Apple Vision Pro. Strangely enough, it’s not because of faulty reasons, or anything related to them. Typically product returns, are often broken by themselves (which others experience as well), or the standards of the product do not meet expectations.

Apple’s Vision Pro, however, has some admittedly chucklesome reasons as to why they, even the Apple fanboys, are returning the products.

People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?
Screenshot credit: Quartz

The Comfort is Not Up to Par

People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?
A person using Apple Vision Pro at McDonalds (image credit: Ben Geskin).

As futuristic as Apple Vision Pro may seem (revolutionary even), Apple had probably lost sight of (pun unintended) one major factor in using an everyday, portable device — comfort. Apple Vision Pro has issues with the headband pressure, light leakage, facial interface, and weight distribution.

The headband of the Apple Vision Pro, as described by many of the reviewers on YouTube, is very soft to the touch, which is definitely a plus for the wearers. Props to Apple for the materials chosen. The pressure, however, can be intolerable for some. It’s like wearing a pair of goggles for a prolonged period of time; the band starts to sink into the skin of the head. That’s when even the polyester materials wouldn’t do much help in reducing the discomfort for the users.

People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?
People seen in public places wearing Apple Vision Pro headsets (image credit: Leander Kahney).

The light leakage tends to happen as the sealing around the eye cups allows external light to seep in, breaking immersion and potentially causing eye strain. The headset may not be fitting for all, as some users may have smaller head shapes, or elongated faces where the area around the eye sockets may not provide enough seals for the headset to glue to the head.

Speaking of which, the display system of the headset might have caused discomfort around the nose and cheeks for some users, given how heavy it is. Along with the pressure from the band, the weight of the headset resting on the nasal bone means that the users won’t be able to wear the headset for a prolonged period of time, especially when doing tasks that would jolt the headset, shifting the pressure on the bone unevenly.

Regardless, the weight distribution is the ultimate contributing factor to the discomfort. All the weight rests at the display, where the eyes are. So, in some ways, the wearer’s head would be slightly tilted forward, forcing him or her to compensate by tilting backward. Over prolonged periods, this would cause slight neck pain. It kind of negates the whole idea of replacing smartphones if the headset itself is unusable for a long period of time.

Not to mention the headaches, too. People who aren’t used to virtual reality may have issues with adapting to the screen in any VR headset, let alone Apple Vision Pro which can be disorienting at times after extensive uses, which negates the comfort.

The Hype Didn’t Meet Many Expectations, Yet

People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?
Apple Vision Pro headset at WWDC 2023 (image credit: Jason Hiner).

In July 2023, I wrote about Apple’s VR headset, and how it applies the concept of living in a virtual world. That idea alone sparked many interests, along with fears, among the public. Regardless of the reactions, they expected that from the headset that Apple had offered.

As the product launched on 2nd February 2024 in the United States, the hyped dimmed because of the low number of applications available, which yielded absolutely very few practical uses. Netflix, the popular streaming service, isn’t even available in Apple Vision Pro, as mentioned by co-CEO of Netflix (Greg Peters) that “his streaming service would take a “wait-and-see” approach“.

That, along with the hefty price tag on the headset, leads to an obvious disappointment among the users. Who wouldn’t, really — with the price of a 2010 Myvi car, you would expect the headset to be more capable than just browsing YouTube videos through Safari.

People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?
Meta’s Quest 3 VR headset (image credit: Alan Truly).

Meta’s Quest 3 VR headset was capable of virtual reality gaming, and it cost not even half of Apple Vision Pro. Compatibility-wise, sure, Apple wins, but with the few practical uses, users would want to magnify their true needs and/or wants when they are planning to buy a headset. For those who have a wide array of Apple devices, and prefer ecosystems and use headsets for work-related purposes, the Apple Vision Pro is indeed for them. Otherwise, the other VR headsets such as the Meta’s Quest 3 would do decently enough, as it’s made for the masses.

Should We Buy Apple Vision Pro?

People are Returning Apple Vision Pro. Why?
People using Apple Vision Pro in public (image credit: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu).

Eh, it’s not bad, per se. But it is understandable why people are returning the product. The hefty price range definitely brings out demands, and if the products can’t fulfill those expectations, chances are they are deemed of no value. So, unless you’re an Apple enthusiast, which I doubt would be even the case, there’s not much reason to, yet. Apple Vision Pro can be seen as a prototype of some sort i.e. to see how far they can invest in the products that can be adapted in the virtual world.

If you’re interested in reading more about the concept of Metaverse, feel free to read it here. Or, an article related to iOS 17 might suit your interests more. See you some other time!

Author

  • Muhammad Hariz

    A ’00 Malaysian freelance writer for MugenMilano. Occasionally writes for fun; otherwise, going to the gym and playing video games would be the R&R for Hariz. Having a keen interest in the area of gaming and technology, Hariz’s written materials would mostly be tech-related and gaming news, particularly in adventure, horror, and fighting genre. Doesn’t stop him from writing other interesting topics, though, as long as it is worth checking out.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *